Facebook and Amazon Change the Streaming Video Marketplace

The entries of Amazon and Facebook into the streaming video marketplace stand to change the economics and dynamics of watching video online.  While shortcomings and constraints will slow their impact in the near-term, make no mistake about it:  the economics and approaches have changed.

It’s easy to dismiss these solutions in the short-term.  No, Amazon doesn’t have the library of a Netflix.  No, the Facebook experience isn’t optimized for long-form video consumption.  If, however, you dismiss these two based on these shortcomings, you’re missing the point.

Let’s look at Amazon first.  For Amazon, this is a shrewd, and necessary move.  Amazon Prime, which offers free two-day shipping for all Amazon purchases for $79/year, is increasingly irrelevant as Amazon’s book sales move to digital.  By the middle of last year Kindle sales on Amazon surpassed hardcover books, by the four quarter that extended to paperback books as well, and on Christmas day Amazon sold more e-books than physical books combined (although that number may certainly have been skewed by the number of people opening Kindles as presents that day).  Thus, it is clear that Amazon had to do something to enhance the value of Prime for its most valued customers.  Of course, Amazon sells much more than books so Prime still has considerable appeal even for those who consume their books digitally.  Amazon wins either way.  If you get value because of the free shipping offer, the availability of streaming video for no extra cost is a compelling value-add.  And if you’re evaluating the competing streaming video options, Amazon is cheaper than Netflix ($100/year) and offers more than just streaming.  (Here’s an interesting analysis of the customer overlap between Netflix and Amazon.)  What’s most notable about Amazon’s offer:

  • It’s cheaper than the market leader, without any other considerations.
  • It’s bundled with other value, making it appear free to a significant range of customers.

Facebook’s entry is much more limited and complex but longer-term perhaps more impactful.  Much more limited.  A single movie at launch, The Dark Knight (incidentally, one of my 10 favorite movies of all time).  But this one is much more potentially transformational.  So what’s interesting about Facebook’s entry here?

  • While initially a standalone experience (and probably a sub-optimal one at that), given its market position I expect Facebook’s movie-viewing experience to rapidly evolve to a social experience.  From a marketing perspective, that talks to the viral potential.  More importantly, though, from a viewing experience, you could envision how Facebook could leverage its platform to increase the social elements in movie viewing in both synchronous and asynchronous fashions.  For instance, you might not only chat with other friends in real-time while you’re both watching a movie, you might also see the comments from other friends appear at the same point in the movie even if they’re not watching it at the same time.  Facebook can significantly shape the social movie viewing experience in a way that doesn’t exist today.  Twitter leads the real-time synchronous market today (e.g., we all Tweet during the Academy Awards) but the non-real-time and asynchronous markets are very much in play and Facebook can lead the way here.
  • The role of Facebook Credits in paying for movies is very interesting.  I have long been a believer of “count down” models vs. “count up.”  A count-up model is one where you pay for each purchase.  Every transaction counts up the amount of money you’re spending on the particular activity, and thus is an individual purchase decision.  In a count-down model,  you have a pool of credits you can “count down” against.  In your mind, the money is already spent and it’s just about how you’re going to spend the money.  With Facebook Credits, users will have a variety of ways to spend their currency (games, movies, other products and services) and a variety of ways to acquire it (you can even buy gift cards at Target).  This will make it easy to make an impulse buy of a movie (whereas Netflix and Amazon at their price points are considered purchases).

For different reasons, the entrance of Amazon and Facebook into the streaming video marketplace change the landscape.  The net result is that the marketplace has new competitive requirements.

  • Movie viewing alone may not be enough to sell a movie service.
  • The social experience of watching a movie online is in its infancy but is likely to change very quickly.
  • The payment models for video consumption are expanding, and will include:
    • Subscriptions
    • Virtual payments
    • Bundling with other services
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